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The next-generation Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers are designed to be ready for the next 100 years of naval aviation innovation. U.S. Navy aircraft carriers sustain America’s naval aviation capability advantages today and in the future by having the growth capacity to accommodate new aircraft and technology. Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) is one of the newest features to be implemented on the Ford-class carriers that pave the way for naval aviation advancements.
The U.S. Navy recently announced that it will be moving forward with its unmanned aircraft programs to ensure that the aircraft carrier air wing possess the complex, future technologies to maintain its edge as the preeminent warfighting force. Successful unmanned aircraft testing last year has shown how quickly the carrier air wing is transforming.
As naval aviation continues to evolve over the years, the carrier fleet will be equipped to launch and recover the future air wing maintaining the U.S. Navy’s commitment, “be where it matters, when it matters, by maintaining a robust forward presence and appropriate readiness.”
Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

The next-generation Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carriers are designed to be ready for the next 100 years of naval aviation innovation. U.S. Navy aircraft carriers sustain America’s naval aviation capability advantages today and in the future by having the growth capacity to accommodate new aircraft and technology. Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) is one of the newest features to be implemented on the Ford-class carriers that pave the way for naval aviation advancements.

The U.S. Navy recently announced that it will be moving forward with its unmanned aircraft programs to ensure that the aircraft carrier air wing possess the complex, future technologies to maintain its edge as the preeminent warfighting force. Successful unmanned aircraft testing last year has shown how quickly the carrier air wing is transforming.

As naval aviation continues to evolve over the years, the carrier fleet will be equipped to launch and recover the future air wing maintaining the U.S. Navy’s commitment, “be where it matters, when it matters, by maintaining a robust forward presence and appropriate readiness.

Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

Gerald R. Ford  (CVN 78)  is the first aircraft carrier to make a significant leap to electrical power preparing the ship for future technologies. Built with the future in mind, Gerald R. Ford is threaded with over 750 miles of fiber optic cable and outfitted with flexible space to accommodate tomorrow’s weapons, such as high energy lasers. Designed to be powering the future for the next 100 years, Ford-class carriers will be the most advanced ships in the sea with the weapons systems that give the U.S. Navy the advantage in any conflict.
 Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

Gerald R. Ford  (CVN 78)  is the first aircraft carrier to make a significant leap to electrical power preparing the ship for future technologies. Built with the future in mind, Gerald R. Ford is threaded with over 750 miles of fiber optic cable and outfitted with flexible space to accommodate tomorrow’s weapons, such as high energy lasers. Designed to be powering the future for the next 100 years, Ford-class carriers will be the most advanced ships in the sea with the weapons systems that give the U.S. Navy the advantage in any conflict.

 Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

On April 18, 1942, from a position at sea 668 miles from Tokyo, the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV 8) launched 16 B-25s of the 17th AAF Air Group led by Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy H. Doolittle, for the first attack on the Japanese homeland.
On the morning of the attack, while still 650 nautical miles from Japan, a Japanese picket boat sighted the U.S. forces and immediately radioed a warning to headquarters in Japan. U.S. forces immediately launched the strike – 12 hours earlier and 150 nautical miles farther from Japan than planned. Although none of the B-25 pilots, including Doolittle, had ever taken off from an aircraft carrier before, all 16 planes were launched safely in one hour.
This mission occurred just four months after the attack on Pearl Harbor and demonstrated the newly discovered air wing capabilities of the carrier.
This feat signified that carrier “presence matters” to ensure U.S. readiness around the world. Carriers are at the highest operational tempo since WWII and so it is even more important than even that an 11-carrier fleet is maintained through the carrier midlife modernization process. As history proved in 1942, aircraft carriers capabilities are always evolving to current mission needs making them the preeminent ships in the sea.
Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

On April 18, 1942, from a position at sea 668 miles from Tokyo, the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Hornet (CV 8) launched 16 B-25s of the 17th AAF Air Group led by Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy H. Doolittle, for the first attack on the Japanese homeland.

On the morning of the attack, while still 650 nautical miles from Japan, a Japanese picket boat sighted the U.S. forces and immediately radioed a warning to headquarters in Japan. U.S. forces immediately launched the strike – 12 hours earlier and 150 nautical miles farther from Japan than planned. Although none of the B-25 pilots, including Doolittle, had ever taken off from an aircraft carrier before, all 16 planes were launched safely in one hour.

This mission occurred just four months after the attack on Pearl Harbor and demonstrated the newly discovered air wing capabilities of the carrier.

This feat signified that carrier “presence matters” to ensure U.S. readiness around the world. Carriers are at the highest operational tempo since WWII and so it is even more important than even that an 11-carrier fleet is maintained through the carrier midlife modernization process. As history proved in 1942, aircraft carriers capabilities are always evolving to current mission needs making them the preeminent ships in the sea.

Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

In today’s day and age, there’s nothing better than physical presence. As Marine Brigadier General Michael Groen said last week at the Sea-Air-Space Exposition when speaking about the importance of presence when providing disaster relief, “If you’re not there when it’s raining, you won’t be there when it’s raining bullets.”
 Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

In today’s day and age, there’s nothing better than physical presence. As Marine Brigadier General Michael Groen said last week at the Sea-Air-Space Exposition when speaking about the importance of presence when providing disaster relief, “If you’re not there when it’s raining, you won’t be there when it’s raining bullets.”

 Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

When an aircraft carrier undergoes its midlife modernization, known as refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH), it is transformed and prepared for another 25 years of service. Upon completing RCOH, a carrier is updated with the latest technology and advanced capabilities.

This infographic outlines the importance of RCOH to a carrier’s lifecycle. It further emphasizes how vital the midlife modernization process is to keeping the U.S. Navy fleet at 11 carriers, the minimum number required for the U.S. Navy to continue to be forward deployed “where it matters, when it matters.”
Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

When an aircraft carrier undergoes its midlife modernization, known as refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH), it is transformed and prepared for another 25 years of service. Upon completing RCOH, a carrier is updated with the latest technology and advanced capabilities.

This infographic outlines the importance of RCOH to a carrier’s lifecycle. It further emphasizes how vital the midlife modernization process is to keeping the U.S. Navy fleet at 11 carriers, the minimum number required for the U.S. Navy to continue to be forward deployed “where it matters, when it matters.”

Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

With the newest class of aircraft carriers, Gerald R. Ford-class, comes cutting-edge innovation. Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) is being designed and built to be the world’s most technologically advanced warship. 
One of these cutting-edge innovations is the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) catapult which will launch and recovers aircraft using electric power rather than steam. According to Captain James Donnelly, manager of the launcher, the U.S. Navy was so impressed with the push delivered by the new EMALS electric catapult that Gerald R. Ford is in effect being built around the concept with the ship being powered using electricity rather than steam.

The Economist article “Catapulting Ahead” explains the advanced capabilities of EMALS and the other tech-innovations that will propel the new carrier class to be leaps ahead of the other ship in the sea.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

With the newest class of aircraft carriers, Gerald R. Ford-class, comes cutting-edge innovation. Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) is being designed and built to be the world’s most technologically advanced warship

One of these cutting-edge innovations is the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) catapult which will launch and recovers aircraft using electric power rather than steam. According to Captain James Donnelly, manager of the launcher, the U.S. Navy was so impressed with the push delivered by the new EMALS electric catapult that Gerald R. Ford is in effect being built around the concept with the ship being powered using electricity rather than steam.

The Economist article “Catapulting Ahead” explains the advanced capabilities of EMALS and the other tech-innovations that will propel the new carrier class to be leaps ahead of the other ship in the sea.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy