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Over 90 percent of world trade is moved by sea, including much of the world’s gas and oil supply. U.S. Navy aircraft carriers and their strike forces are continuously on patrol in vital regions of the world to keep shipping lanes open, protect the interests of the United States and its allies, and preserve Americans’ freedom and way of life.
With unprecedented technology and unmatched capabilities, U.S. Navy carriers deliver a one-of-a-kind mix of combat power and humanitarian relief to every corner of the globe. Like CNO Adm. Jonathan Greenert stated, the need for U.S. Navy carriers to be deployed around the world has only increased. It’s imperative that our nation maintains at least an 11-carrier fleet to be ready now and in the foreseeable future. 
Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Over 90 percent of world trade is moved by sea, including much of the world’s gas and oil supply. U.S. Navy aircraft carriers and their strike forces are continuously on patrol in vital regions of the world to keep shipping lanes open, protect the interests of the United States and its allies, and preserve Americans’ freedom and way of life.

With unprecedented technology and unmatched capabilities, U.S. Navy carriers deliver a one-of-a-kind mix of combat power and humanitarian relief to every corner of the globe. Like CNO Adm. Jonathan Greenert stated, the need for U.S. Navy carriers to be deployed around the world has only increased. It’s imperative that our nation maintains at least an 11-carrier fleet to be ready now and in the foreseeable future. 

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Former and current sailors, friends and families who served aboard USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), we want to see your flight operations photos! Send us your pictures to photos@acibc.org and we’ll be posting your photos to our Flickr account. 
USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) is currently deployed in the Arabian Gulf in support of security operations in the region. With the sudden, increasing unrest in Iraq, last month Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel summoned USS George H.W. Bush to be stationed in the region. Bush was the first to respond and arrive in the Arabian Gulf bringing along other naval ships as additional support. USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) ability to react and be present in the region immediately showcased its flexibility and the crucial importance of having enough carriers available for crisis situations.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Former and current sailors, friends and families who served aboard USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), we want to see your flight operations photos! Send us your pictures to photos@acibc.org and we’ll be posting your photos to our Flickr account

USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) is currently deployed in the Arabian Gulf in support of security operations in the region. With the sudden, increasing unrest in Iraq, last month Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel summoned USS George H.W. Bush to be stationed in the region. Bush was the first to respond and arrive in the Arabian Gulf bringing along other naval ships as additional support. USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) ability to react and be present in the region immediately showcased its flexibility and the crucial importance of having enough carriers available for crisis situations.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

In a recent interview with Military Officer, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert discussed the impact of the Budget Control Act’s (BCA) funding reduction levels on the U.S. Navy’s mission capabilities:

“The question now is what happens in 2016 and out. In terms of the 10 missions the Navy has under the current defense strategy, I can’t do at least four under a BCA sequestration scenario. It also will seriously hurt shipbuilding and our industrial base.”

The uncertainty of future funding levels threatens the on-time work of the refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) of USS George Washington (CVN 73) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) – the next two carriers scheduled for their midlife modernization. During a RCOH — which all Nimitz-class aircraft carriers go through near the midpoint of their 50-year life cycle — a carrier’s nuclear fuel is replenished and the ship’s services and infrastructure are upgraded and modernized with new technologies that enable the ship to respond to future challenges and continue to play a vital role in our national defense for another 25 years. It is critical that the U.S. Navy maintains a shipbuilding schedule with 11 carriers so it can sustain the strategic surge capacity that is required of it.
A minimum of 11 carriers is vital for our national security and protecting American interests around the globe. As future funding decisions are made about the Navy’s carrier fleet, Congress must remember Rear Admiral Thomas Moore statement, “We’re an 11-carrier Navy in a 15-carrier world.”
Photo Source: U.S. Navy

In a recent interview with Military Officer, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert discussed the impact of the Budget Control Act’s (BCA) funding reduction levels on the U.S. Navy’s mission capabilities:

“The question now is what happens in 2016 and out. In terms of the 10 missions the Navy has under the current defense strategy, I can’t do at least four under a BCA sequestration scenario. It also will seriously hurt shipbuilding and our industrial base.”

The uncertainty of future funding levels threatens the on-time work of the refueling and complex overhaul (RCOH) of USS George Washington (CVN 73) and USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) – the next two carriers scheduled for their midlife modernization. During a RCOH — which all Nimitz-class aircraft carriers go through near the midpoint of their 50-year life cycle — a carrier’s nuclear fuel is replenished and the ship’s services and infrastructure are upgraded and modernized with new technologies that enable the ship to respond to future challenges and continue to play a vital role in our national defense for another 25 years. It is critical that the U.S. Navy maintains a shipbuilding schedule with 11 carriers so it can sustain the strategic surge capacity that is required of it.

A minimum of 11 carriers is vital for our national security and protecting American interests around the globe. As future funding decisions are made about the Navy’s carrier fleet, Congress must remember Rear Admiral Thomas Moore statement, “We’re an 11-carrier Navy in a 15-carrier world.”

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Today commemorates the 24th anniversary of the christening ceremony of USS George Washington (CVN 73). On July 21, 1990, the ship was christened by her sponsor, First Lady Barbara Bush, at Newport News Shipbuilding.

Since her commissioning in 1992, USS George Washington has served our country on being where it matters, when it matters. In November 2013 the George Washington Strike Group traveled to the Philippines to provide relief in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Five-thousand U.S. Navy sailors delivered food, water and medicine to the 11 million people left homeless by the strongest storm to ever hit landfall. Aircraft were also available from George Washington’s carrier strike group to distribute supplies, providing search and rescue, and transportation to and from isolated areas affected by the devastating typhoon. The carrier’s ability to serve up to 20,000 meals a day also proved crucial to helping those affected by the typhoon.

As natural disasters continue to be random and unexpected, it remains crucial that the presence of carriers stays strong. When disaster strikes suddenly around the globe, U.S. Navy aircraft carriers are prepared and able to provide necessary relief.  As we celebrate its christening anniversary, we remember the accomplishments of USS George Washington (CVN 73) and anticipate the future aid it will provide to those in crisis. 

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

“The ability to station and supply a Navy/Marine Corps Team anywhere around the globe, ready for immediate combat, demonstrates, yet again, why the U.S. Navy Fleets of Carrier Battle Groups and ARG/MEUs are invaluable assets for American military power projection.” – Ed Timperlake
With rising political and sectarian tension near the Persian Gulf, it is imperative that U.S. Navy carrier forces are present and ready to provide humanitarian aid and project necessary power in the efforts for stability within the country. When unrest erupted recently in Iraq, U.S. Navy forces were quick to respond. USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) was the first to arrive in the area with necessary airpower as well as a carrier fleet of escort ships and guided missile cruisers. The ability of Bush and fellow U.S. Navy ships to react immediately in the Persian Gulf accounts significantly for the number of civilian lives saved and efforts to regain stability for the country.
As emphasized in Ed Timperlake’s article, the notion of “presence matters” is ever important. The rapid first response of George H.W. Bush to lend military enforcement and civilian aid to Iraq is tremendous evidence that U.S. Navy carriers are a most valuable asset that must continue to be funded and deployed. Aircraft carriers emphasize a global combat force for good – they provide significant enforcement in crisis areas around the world. They possess major capabilities to carry out advanced, dangerous missions successfully. And in the recent case of Iraq, carriers and their strike groups are first responders for governments and civilians in need.
No matter where in the world, aircraft carriers are deployed where it matters, when it matters.  
Photo Source: U.S. Navy

“The ability to station and supply a Navy/Marine Corps Team anywhere around the globe, ready for immediate combat, demonstrates, yet again, why the U.S. Navy Fleets of Carrier Battle Groups and ARG/MEUs are invaluable assets for American military power projection.” – Ed Timperlake

With rising political and sectarian tension near the Persian Gulf, it is imperative that U.S. Navy carrier forces are present and ready to provide humanitarian aid and project necessary power in the efforts for stability within the country. When unrest erupted recently in Iraq, U.S. Navy forces were quick to respond. USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) was the first to arrive in the area with necessary airpower as well as a carrier fleet of escort ships and guided missile cruisers. The ability of Bush and fellow U.S. Navy ships to react immediately in the Persian Gulf accounts significantly for the number of civilian lives saved and efforts to regain stability for the country.

As emphasized in Ed Timperlake’s article, the notion of “presence matters” is ever important. The rapid first response of George H.W. Bush to lend military enforcement and civilian aid to Iraq is tremendous evidence that U.S. Navy carriers are a most valuable asset that must continue to be funded and deployed. Aircraft carriers emphasize a global combat force for good – they provide significant enforcement in crisis areas around the world. They possess major capabilities to carry out advanced, dangerous missions successfully. And in the recent case of Iraq, carriers and their strike groups are first responders for governments and civilians in need.

No matter where in the world, aircraft carriers are deployed where it matters, when it matters.  

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

The future of carrier aviation lies in Ford-class carriers. Ford-class carriers will possess advanced aviation capabilities that exceed those of the current carrier fleet. The electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) will replace older steam versions and enable a smoother, more efficient launch for aircraft, which are predicted to increase flight missions per day by 25 percent. EMALS combined with the increased flight deck area and other ship enhancements allow for the improved sortie generation rate.
Photo sources: Huntington Ingalls Industries and U.S. Navy

The future of carrier aviation lies in Ford-class carriers. Ford-class carriers will possess advanced aviation capabilities that exceed those of the current carrier fleet. The electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) will replace older steam versions and enable a smoother, more efficient launch for aircraft, which are predicted to increase flight missions per day by 25 percent. EMALS combined with the increased flight deck area and other ship enhancements allow for the improved sortie generation rate.

Photo sources: Huntington Ingalls Industries and U.S. Navy

“It was time for the Navy to develop a next-generation carrier with greatly enhanced growth potential, improved capabilities, and lower life-cycle cost. The result is the Gerald R. Ford, which has much greater electrical-generating capacity, new electrical-distribution architecture, a simpler and more efficient nuclear-power plant, a more efficient flight deck, plus modern electromagnetic systems in place of older steam and hydraulic systems, and increased naval-architectural margins.”
Retired Captain J. Talbot Manvel, Jr. published an editorial in Proceedings Magazine that outlines why Gerald R. Ford is such an investment to our nation’s security and naval forces. He details the upgrades to the new carrier class which has resulted “in reductions in life-cycle costs for manpower and maintenance,” a $4 billion reduction in life-cycle costs per ship, and advanced capabilities. In short, Ford-class carriers equal more bang for the buck.
With the new, advanced Ford-class carriers, overall costs are significantly reduced and the Navy can further expand and upgrade their capabilities. Improvements like an electromagnetic catapult system and new electrical-distribution architecture contribute to the ship’s long term growth capacity that will last for the next 100 years.
Read the full editorial by Captain Manvel to learn how Ford-class carriers will be ready for the next 100 years. As technology advances, so must our nation’s carriers. With Ford-class carriers, our U.S. Navy will be more ready to respond when the President asks “Where’s the nearest carrier?”
Photo Source: U.S. Navy

It was time for the Navy to develop a next-generation carrier with greatly enhanced growth potential, improved capabilities, and lower life-cycle cost. The result is the Gerald R. Ford, which has much greater electrical-generating capacity, new electrical-distribution architecture, a simpler and more efficient nuclear-power plant, a more efficient flight deck, plus modern electromagnetic systems in place of older steam and hydraulic systems, and increased naval-architectural margins.”

Retired Captain J. Talbot Manvel, Jr. published an editorial in Proceedings Magazine that outlines why Gerald R. Ford is such an investment to our nation’s security and naval forces. He details the upgrades to the new carrier class which has resulted “in reductions in life-cycle costs for manpower and maintenance,” a $4 billion reduction in life-cycle costs per ship, and advanced capabilities. In short, Ford-class carriers equal more bang for the buck.

With the new, advanced Ford-class carriers, overall costs are significantly reduced and the Navy can further expand and upgrade their capabilities. Improvements like an electromagnetic catapult system and new electrical-distribution architecture contribute to the ship’s long term growth capacity that will last for the next 100 years.

Read the full editorial by Captain Manvel to learn how Ford-class carriers will be ready for the next 100 years. As technology advances, so must our nation’s carriers. With Ford-class carriers, our U.S. Navy will be more ready to respond when the President asks “Where’s the nearest carrier?”

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Today we celebrate President Gerald R. Ford’s 101st birthday – the namesake of the new, most advanced Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) aircraft carrier.
The legacy and accomplishments of President Ford will live on with Ford-class carriers. Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) and Enterprise (CVN 80) will project presence, capability and security for the next 100 years and live up to the achievements of excellence that President Ford championed. We salute all that President Ford has done for his country and honor his life with the power and strength of aircraft carriers.
Watch this new video from Huntington Ingalls Industries honoring President Ford on his 101st Birthday.

Today we celebrate President Gerald R. Ford’s 101st birthday – the namesake of the new, most advanced Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) aircraft carrier.

The legacy and accomplishments of President Ford will live on with Ford-class carriers. Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) and Enterprise (CVN 80) will project presence, capability and security for the next 100 years and live up to the achievements of excellence that President Ford championed. We salute all that President Ford has done for his country and honor his life with the power and strength of aircraft carriers.

Watch this new video from Huntington Ingalls Industries honoring President Ford on his 101st Birthday.