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U.S. Navy aircraft carriers are vital to maintaining our nation’s maritime strength and dominance.  Providing humanitarian aid, diplomatic relations and national security, aircraft carriers are critical to our national security. Maintaining an aircraft carrier’s 50-year lifecycle is crucial to ensure our U.S. Navy is present and forward-deployed anywhere and anytime.  
We want to hear your thoughts on why carrier matter. Using the hashtag #WhyCarriersMatter, tweet your reasons to @aircraftcarrier or post to our Facebook page.  If available, please include your carrier photos as well!
Photo Source: U.S. Navy

U.S. Navy aircraft carriers are vital to maintaining our nation’s maritime strength and dominance.  Providing humanitarian aid, diplomatic relations and national security, aircraft carriers are critical to our national security. Maintaining an aircraft carrier’s 50-year lifecycle is crucial to ensure our U.S. Navy is present and forward-deployed anywhere and anytime.  

We want to hear your thoughts on why carrier matter. Using the hashtag #WhyCarriersMatter, tweet your reasons to @aircraftcarrier or post to our Facebook page.  If available, please include your carrier photos as well!

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Last week, U.S. Navy history was made when the unmanned X-47B aircraft completed a successfully launch and landing operations with a manned aircraft aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71).  This aircraft milestone marked a significant advancement for carrier aviation and proved the complex capabilities that aircraft carriers can perform. With Roosevelt having completed its mid-life refueling and complex overhaul, this milestone was especially significant.

"[W]e showed that the X-47B could take off, land and fly in the carrier pattern with manned aircraft while maintaining normal flight deck operations," said Capt. Beau Duarte, program manager for the Navy’s Unmanned Carrier Aviation office. "This is key for the future Carrier Air Wing."

The future of carrier airwing is now. With manned and unmanned X-47B aircraft capabilities, aircraft carriers are equipped to be more advanced than ever to conduct important missions to protect American interests at home and abroad. The combined strength of a carrier’s 50-year lifecycle and next-generation air power ensures that aircraft carriers will remain the most advanced, sustainable naval ships.

Footage Source: U.S. Navy

“The top priority needs to be the production and improvement of aircraft carriers, as they’re particularly effective at combating the maritime technologies being developed by hostile regimes.” – Dr. Rebecca Grant, defense analyst at the Washington Security Forum
Defense analyst Dr. Rebecca Grant published an opinion piece in The Washington Times where she argues that the increasingly contested seas require more and better ships for the U.S. Navy. In her piece, “The Dangerous Decline in America’s Maritime Might”, she explains in order to keep a strong, forward-deployed U.S. Navy, it is imperative to maintain a shipbuilding plan that continues to prioritize the construction of aircraft carriers.
Dr. Grant emphasizes the point that aircraft construction must continue so that our nation is ready to combat enemy forces that are becoming increasingly powerful. The advanced Ford-class carriers will possess expandable laser capacity and an improved weapons flow that will increase their effectiveness and maintain their reputations as one of the most lethal maritime platforms. By maintaining construction for these advanced carriers, our nation can ensure a forward-deployed U.S. Navy that will always be ready to protect and defend America’s interests around the world.
Read Dr. Grant’s full editorial here.
Photo Source: Huntington Ingalls Industries

“The top priority needs to be the production and improvement of aircraft carriers, as they’re particularly effective at combating the maritime technologies being developed by hostile regimes.” – Dr. Rebecca Grant, defense analyst at the Washington Security Forum

Defense analyst Dr. Rebecca Grant published an opinion piece in The Washington Times where she argues that the increasingly contested seas require more and better ships for the U.S. Navy. In her piece, “The Dangerous Decline in America’s Maritime Might”, she explains in order to keep a strong, forward-deployed U.S. Navy, it is imperative to maintain a shipbuilding plan that continues to prioritize the construction of aircraft carriers.

Dr. Grant emphasizes the point that aircraft construction must continue so that our nation is ready to combat enemy forces that are becoming increasingly powerful. The advanced Ford-class carriers will possess expandable laser capacity and an improved weapons flow that will increase their effectiveness and maintain their reputations as one of the most lethal maritime platforms. By maintaining construction for these advanced carriers, our nation can ensure a forward-deployed U.S. Navy that will always be ready to protect and defend America’s interests around the world.

Read Dr. Grant’s full editorial here.

Photo Source: Huntington Ingalls Industries

On August 25, 1986, the keel was laid for USS George Washington (CVN 73).  This symbolic event signified the start of the carrier’s construction and the beginning of a 50-year legacy.
In the time since its keel laying ceremony, George Washington has engaged in numerous humanitarian aid and security missions, emphasizing how vital aircraft carriers are to support American operations abroad. Stationed in Japan, George Washington provided vital aid when Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines this past November. The carrier has also been vital in maintaining diplomatic relations between the United States and South Korea, conducting naval drills and hosting distinguished South Korean guests onboard.
In order for aircraft carriers to support current and future warfare and be a 50-year investment, a mid-life refueling and complex overhaul of the ship is necessary. The RCOH process is imperative for carriers to continue operating as the centerpiece of the U.S. Navy fleet for another 25 years.  USS George Washington’s impending overhaul emphasizes that maintaining RCOH funds should be a priority for our nation to maintain an 11-carrier fleet that is forward-deployed and present around the world.
Photo Source: National Archives

On August 25, 1986, the keel was laid for USS George Washington (CVN 73).  This symbolic event signified the start of the carrier’s construction and the beginning of a 50-year legacy.

In the time since its keel laying ceremony, George Washington has engaged in numerous humanitarian aid and security missions, emphasizing how vital aircraft carriers are to support American operations abroad. Stationed in Japan, George Washington provided vital aid when Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines this past November. The carrier has also been vital in maintaining diplomatic relations between the United States and South Korea, conducting naval drills and hosting distinguished South Korean guests onboard.

In order for aircraft carriers to support current and future warfare and be a 50-year investment, a mid-life refueling and complex overhaul of the ship is necessary. The RCOH process is imperative for carriers to continue operating as the centerpiece of the U.S. Navy fleet for another 25 years.  USS George Washington’s impending overhaul emphasizes that maintaining RCOH funds should be a priority for our nation to maintain an 11-carrier fleet that is forward-deployed and present around the world.

Photo Source: National Archives

The recent air wing mission operations of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) in the Arabian Sea once again demonstrate the value of aircraft carriers when our country needs to respond to a rapidly deteriorating situation. As the Navy has pointed out so many times, the presence of our aircraft carrier fleet provides options that no other platform or service can provide.
Bush’s F/A-18F fighter jets are an extremely effective and powerful platform to survey complex battlefields, carefully identifying targets and executing precise power. The targets that have been struck during Iraq airstrikes were so time sensitive that cruise missiles or aircraft from the nearest land base were simply not viable options.
Projecting four-and-a-half acres of diplomacy and power, aircraft carriers are a true force to be reckoned with. Unmatched air and warfare capabilities as well as the ability to execute humanitarian missions prove carriers to be the premier warships of the U.S. Navy.

“We are always ready to support any contingency like that, it’s what we spend all the time training for; it’s just what we do,” said Capt. Andrew Loiselle, USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) commander. Loiselle emphasized that when the President summoned for defense forces in Iraq, Bush and its sailors were ready and equipped to carry out this mission. Bush was at the “tip of the spear” playing a significant role in defeating militant forces and having its air wing deliver much needed humanitarian relief.
The presence of an aircraft carrier fleet provides options that no other platform or service can provide. Only aircraft carriers can deliver the highest magnitude of diplomacy, security and humanitarian aid to the most conflict areas of the world and possess the force to defend against and defeat American enemies.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy
  • Camera: Nikon D3x
  • Apeture: f/8
  • Exposure: 1/800th
  • Focal: 42mm

The recent air wing mission operations of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) in the Arabian Sea once again demonstrate the value of aircraft carriers when our country needs to respond to a rapidly deteriorating situation. As the Navy has pointed out so many times, the presence of our aircraft carrier fleet provides options that no other platform or service can provide.

Bush’s F/A-18F fighter jets are an extremely effective and powerful platform to survey complex battlefields, carefully identifying targets and executing precise power. The targets that have been struck during Iraq airstrikes were so time sensitive that cruise missiles or aircraft from the nearest land base were simply not viable options.

Projecting four-and-a-half acres of diplomacy and power, aircraft carriers are a true force to be reckoned with. Unmatched air and warfare capabilities as well as the ability to execute humanitarian missions prove carriers to be the premier warships of the U.S. Navy.

“We are always ready to support any contingency like that, it’s what we spend all the time training for; it’s just what we do,” said Capt. Andrew Loiselle, USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) commander. Loiselle emphasized that when the President summoned for defense forces in Iraq, Bush and its sailors were ready and equipped to carry out this mission. Bush was at the “tip of the spear” playing a significant role in defeating militant forces and having its air wing deliver much needed humanitarian relief.

The presence of an aircraft carrier fleet provides options that no other platform or service can provide. Only aircraft carriers can deliver the highest magnitude of diplomacy, security and humanitarian aid to the most conflict areas of the world and possess the force to defend against and defeat American enemies.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

“The christening of CVN 78 marks an important milestone for the Gerald R. Ford and brings us one step closer to the delivery of our next-generation CVN and the next 100 years of carrier aviation.”  - Rear Adm. Tom Moore, Program Executive Officer, Aircraft Carriers, November 9, 2013
The U.S. Navy is entering a new era of carrier aviation with the start of below deck-testing of the new aircraft launch system on Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Following months of large-scale hardware deliveries containing critical components of the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) and shipboard installation by Newport News Shipbuilding, the installation of the software—the brains of the new system—is complete.

EMALS will save money over the lifetime of the carrier as it requires less maintenance and fewer operators than the steam system it will replace. The new launch system has a wider operational capability that enables it to launch much lighter and much heavier aircraft and it increases the lifetime of the aircraft because EMALS imparts less stress during launch. The ability to launch a wider range of aircraft weight expands the possibilities for the design of future carrier-based manned and unmanned aircraft.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

“The christening of CVN 78 marks an important milestone for the Gerald R. Ford and brings us one step closer to the delivery of our next-generation CVN and the next 100 years of carrier aviation.”  - Rear Adm. Tom Moore, Program Executive Officer, Aircraft Carriers, November 9, 2013

The U.S. Navy is entering a new era of carrier aviation with the start of below deck-testing of the new aircraft launch system on Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Following months of large-scale hardware deliveries containing critical components of the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) and shipboard installation by Newport News Shipbuilding, the installation of the software—the brains of the new system—is complete.

EMALS will save money over the lifetime of the carrier as it requires less maintenance and fewer operators than the steam system it will replace. The new launch system has a wider operational capability that enables it to launch much lighter and much heavier aircraft and it increases the lifetime of the aircraft because EMALS imparts less stress during launch. The ability to launch a wider range of aircraft weight expands the possibilities for the design of future carrier-based manned and unmanned aircraft.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy