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On the morning of September 11, 2001 USS Enterprise (CVN 65) had nearly completed its six-month deployment to the Arabian Gulf and was scheduled to set sail back to the United States. Upon watching live coverage of the terrorist attacks, “Big E”, without an order from the chain of command, executed a 180-degree course change and returned to the Arabian Gulf in response to the attacks.
After the attacks on September 11, USS Enterprise was a vital force in carrying out U.S. national security and establishing hard power against enemy forces. The carrier remained on station in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, launching airstrikes against al Qaeda terrorist training camps and Taliban military installations in Afghanistan.
USS Enterprise’s rapid response is indicative that an 11-carrier fleet is extremely essential to our nation’s national security and protection of American citizens. It is vital that our nation has a carrier stationed in strategic areas around the world to respond to emergent crises, prevent future threats and maintain stability to the U.S. and its allies.
Today join us in commemorating those who lost their lives on September 11 and the brave men and women who are deployed to preserve American security and freedom.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

On the morning of September 11, 2001 USS Enterprise (CVN 65) had nearly completed its six-month deployment to the Arabian Gulf and was scheduled to set sail back to the United States. Upon watching live coverage of the terrorist attacks, “Big E”, without an order from the chain of command, executed a 180-degree course change and returned to the Arabian Gulf in response to the attacks.

After the attacks on September 11, USS Enterprise was a vital force in carrying out U.S. national security and establishing hard power against enemy forces. The carrier remained on station in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, launching airstrikes against al Qaeda terrorist training camps and Taliban military installations in Afghanistan.

USS Enterprise’s rapid response is indicative that an 11-carrier fleet is extremely essential to our nation’s national security and protection of American citizens. It is vital that our nation has a carrier stationed in strategic areas around the world to respond to emergent crises, prevent future threats and maintain stability to the U.S. and its allies.

Today join us in commemorating those who lost their lives on September 11 and the brave men and women who are deployed to preserve American security and freedom.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Last week, U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) departed from its homeport in Japan to patrol the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region.  While patrolling the 7th Fleet area of operations, USS George Washington will provide security and stability in the Korean theater, the East China Sea and South China Sea. 
Earlier this year, George Washington provided diplomatic relations with South Korea when it hosted naval drills and welcomed distinguished South Korean guests aboard the carrier. For example, in Japan, sailors maintain U.S.-Japanese relations by engaging with Japanese locals and having sailors volunteer at aid organizations like the Zushi Hayama Lions Club.
George Washington’s presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region strengthens relations with allies while maintaining a secure theater in the area. With North Korea posing as an uncertain threat, it is vital that an aircraft carrier is stationed in the area to lend security, stability and presence.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Last week, U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73) departed from its homeport in Japan to patrol the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region.  While patrolling the 7th Fleet area of operations, USS George Washington will provide security and stability in the Korean theater, the East China Sea and South China Sea. 

Earlier this year, George Washington provided diplomatic relations with South Korea when it hosted naval drills and welcomed distinguished South Korean guests aboard the carrier. For example, in Japan, sailors maintain U.S.-Japanese relations by engaging with Japanese locals and having sailors volunteer at aid organizations like the Zushi Hayama Lions Club.

George Washington’s presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region strengthens relations with allies while maintaining a secure theater in the area. With North Korea posing as an uncertain threat, it is vital that an aircraft carrier is stationed in the area to lend security, stability and presence.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

“With 90 percent of global trade carried by sea, and the vast majority of international financial transactions conducted via undersea cables, the U.S. Navy is the backstop for securing a stable global financial system for the U.S. economy to operate in.”
Congressman Randy Forbes (R-VA-04) and former Secretary of the Navy John Lehman’s editorial in National Review Online, “American Seapower for the 21st Century”, highlights the importance of the U.S. Navy and aircraft carriers to manage the seas and maintain a stable trade route for our nation. With carriers transiting the world’s oceans deterring threats and responding to crises when required, carriers are critical to international commerce. Aircraft carriers are a fundamental player in American trade and allow our nation to access products that would otherwise be unavailable via air or land routes.
In the editorial, Congressman Forbes and Lehman emphasize that “the Navy is a highly versatile force that can generate sovereign, forward-deployed military power to do anything from strategic nuclear deterrence to humanitarian assistance.” Since aircraft carriers are 4.5 acres of sovereign, U.S. territory they have the size to transport necessary fire and air power as well as deliver ample food, water and medical care when nations are hit with the unexpected disaster.
Aircraft carriers make America a sea power that is versatile to serve the needs of its citizens and international allies. The ships are imperative in securing American trade routes to deliver supplies back home while acting as a national security and humanitarian force.
Read Congressman Forbes and John Lehman’s full editorial about the vital significance of the U.S. Navy and aircraft carriers.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

With 90 percent of global trade carried by sea, and the vast majority of international financial transactions conducted via undersea cables, the U.S. Navy is the backstop for securing a stable global financial system for the U.S. economy to operate in.

Congressman Randy Forbes (R-VA-04) and former Secretary of the Navy John Lehman’s editorial in National Review Online, “American Seapower for the 21st Century”, highlights the importance of the U.S. Navy and aircraft carriers to manage the seas and maintain a stable trade route for our nation. With carriers transiting the world’s oceans deterring threats and responding to crises when required, carriers are critical to international commerce. Aircraft carriers are a fundamental player in American trade and allow our nation to access products that would otherwise be unavailable via air or land routes.

In the editorial, Congressman Forbes and Lehman emphasize that “the Navy is a highly versatile force that can generate sovereign, forward-deployed military power to do anything from strategic nuclear deterrence to humanitarian assistance.” Since aircraft carriers are 4.5 acres of sovereign, U.S. territory they have the size to transport necessary fire and air power as well as deliver ample food, water and medical care when nations are hit with the unexpected disaster.

Aircraft carriers make America a sea power that is versatile to serve the needs of its citizens and international allies. The ships are imperative in securing American trade routes to deliver supplies back home while acting as a national security and humanitarian force.

Read Congressman Forbes and John Lehman’s full editorial about the vital significance of the U.S. Navy and aircraft carriers.

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

Tomorrow, September 6, we commemorate the keel laying anniversary in 2003 of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), which signified the start of the carrier’s construction. From the start of its construction, USS George H. W. Bush was designed to rapidly and decisively respond to global crises, like the airstrike operation it is currently supporting in Iraq.

Former Virginia Senator John Warner delivered remarks at the keel laying ceremony. Viewed at the time as one of the most influential senators on military and foreign policy issues, he was a champion of U.S. Navy carriers and its shipbuilding program.

Appropriately tomorrow marks another momentous occasion with the christening of the Virginia-class submarine John Warner (SSN 785). Join us in saluting John Warner—a sailor, a Marine lieutenant, Secretary of the Navy, U.S. Senator—and now a Virginia-class submarine.   

Slideshow of pictures from John Warner’s distinguished career.  

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

The next-generation of Gerald R. Ford-class carriers will lead the way in securing American global interests and maintaining world order. Our nation needs an aircraft carrier fleet that has the utmost capabilities to defend against enemy threats, provide secure and open trade routes and maintain diplomatic relations with allies.
As former Secretary of the Navy Donald C. Winter states, no other ship will be as global and represent our nation’s capabilities like Gerald R. Ford-class carriers. The most advanced naval ships in the world, Ford-class ships will allow our nation to be forward deployed in strategic areas of the world with cutting-edge capabilities. Expandable laser capacity, increased sortie rates of both manned and unmanned aircraft and adaptable interior spaces enable Ford-class carriers to emit hard and soft powers for national security and complex aid missions.

An aircraft carrier represents sovereign U.S. territory patrolling the globe. It possesses tremendous versatility and can easily transition into large-scale major combat operations or provide vital medical and food assistance to friends and allies in need. With Ford-class carriers being introduced into the naval fleet, the U.S. will continue to project its power and presence around the globe. 
Photo Source: U.S. Navy

The next-generation of Gerald R. Ford-class carriers will lead the way in securing American global interests and maintaining world order. Our nation needs an aircraft carrier fleet that has the utmost capabilities to defend against enemy threats, provide secure and open trade routes and maintain diplomatic relations with allies.

As former Secretary of the Navy Donald C. Winter states, no other ship will be as global and represent our nation’s capabilities like Gerald R. Ford-class carriers. The most advanced naval ships in the world, Ford-class ships will allow our nation to be forward deployed in strategic areas of the world with cutting-edge capabilities. Expandable laser capacity, increased sortie rates of both manned and unmanned aircraft and adaptable interior spaces enable Ford-class carriers to emit hard and soft powers for national security and complex aid missions.

An aircraft carrier represents sovereign U.S. territory patrolling the globe. It possesses tremendous versatility and can easily transition into large-scale major combat operations or provide vital medical and food assistance to friends and allies in need. With Ford-class carriers being introduced into the naval fleet, the U.S. will continue to project its power and presence around the globe. 

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

On August 22, USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) departed its homeport in San Diego to begin its nine-month deployment in the Western Pacific and Central Command areas of responsibility. It is scheduled to replace USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) from duty in the Arabian Gulf, where Bush had been conducting airstrikes and security missions against insurgents threatening Iraq.
More than 6,000 sailors deployed aboard the carrier strike groupto focus on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. Vinson’s planned deployment demonstrates the importance of the carrier life cycle rotation. Maintaining 3 carriers available on station for critical missions around the globe requires 11 carriers in a continuous schedule of deployment, training and maintenance. To have three carriers projecting power and strength around the globe, keeping shipping lanes open, and responding to a crisis at a moment’s notice, America needs a fleet of 11 carriers.

Photo Source: U.S.  Navy

On August 22, USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) departed its homeport in San Diego to begin its nine-month deployment in the Western Pacific and Central Command areas of responsibility. It is scheduled to replace USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) from duty in the Arabian Gulf, where Bush had been conducting airstrikes and security missions against insurgents threatening Iraq.

More than 6,000 sailors deployed aboard the carrier strike groupto focus on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts. Vinson’s planned deployment demonstrates the importance of the carrier life cycle rotation. Maintaining 3 carriers available on station for critical missions around the globe requires 11 carriers in a continuous schedule of deployment, training and maintenance. To have three carriers projecting power and strength around the globe, keeping shipping lanes open, and responding to a crisis at a moment’s notice, America needs a fleet of 11 carriers.

Photo Source: U.S.  Navy