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On October 11, 1975, the keel of  USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) was laid at Newport News Shipbuilding, marking the formal start of construction on the third ship of the Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. The keel serves as the foundation or spine of the ship’s hull.
Carl Vinson honors its namesake, Congressman Carl Vinson, who served as the Chairman of the House of Naval Affairs for 29 years and was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia for 50 years. Congressman Vinson was among the nation’s leading advocates of naval power. More than any other person, Vinson was responsible for the buildup of the U.S. Navy and its air power before World War II. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the Pacific Fleet Commander during World War II, said of him, "I do not know where this country would have been after December 7, 1941, if it had not had the ships and the know-how to build more ships fast, for which one Vinson Bill after another was responsible."
Honoring this legacy, USS Carl Vinson has been projecting power since its commissioning in 1982. Notable contributions of USS Carl Vinson and its crew include completing 4,200 combat sorties during Operation Enduring Freedom, providing aid to earthquake-ravaged Haiti in 2010, and hosting the first NCAA basketball game to take place aboard an aircraft carrier, which President Obama attended.
In less than a month, on November 9, Newport News Shipbuilding will mark another historic shipyard milestone when the largest, most powerful, and most technologically advanced ship ever built, Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), is christened. Ford will continue the legacy of Carl Vinson through its capabilities of providing defense and security across the globe.
Learn more about USS Carl Vinson: http://www.cvn70.navy.mil/
Photo Source: U.S. Navy

On October 11, 1975, the keel of  USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) was laid at Newport News Shipbuilding, marking the formal start of construction on the third ship of the Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. The keel serves as the foundation or spine of the ship’s hull.

Carl Vinson honors its namesake, Congressman Carl Vinson, who served as the Chairman of the House of Naval Affairs for 29 years and was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia for 50 years. Congressman Vinson was among the nation’s leading advocates of naval power. More than any other person, Vinson was responsible for the buildup of the U.S. Navy and its air power before World War II. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, the Pacific Fleet Commander during World War II, said of him, "I do not know where this country would have been after December 7, 1941, if it had not had the ships and the know-how to build more ships fast, for which one Vinson Bill after another was responsible."

Honoring this legacy, USS Carl Vinson has been projecting power since its commissioning in 1982. Notable contributions of USS Carl Vinson and its crew include completing 4,200 combat sorties during Operation Enduring Freedom, providing aid to earthquake-ravaged Haiti in 2010, and hosting the first NCAA basketball game to take place aboard an aircraft carrier, which President Obama attended.

In less than a month, on November 9, Newport News Shipbuilding will mark another historic shipyard milestone when the largest, most powerful, and most technologically advanced ship ever built, Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), is christened. Ford will continue the legacy of Carl Vinson through its capabilities of providing defense and security across the globe.

Learn more about USS Carl Vinson: http://www.cvn70.navy.mil/

Photo Source: U.S. Navy

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